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Jun 19, 2014

Summer time livin in raybans

Stay tuned for the new Paige Gamble lookbook !!Fall 2014
May 30, 2014

Stay tuned for the new Paige Gamble lookbook !!
Fall 2014


Apr 16, 2014 / 15 notes

In between Dreams- Free people lookbook shot by David Bellemere


http://www.freepeople.com/trends-in-between-dreams/

Apr 16, 2014 / 3 notes

The Neiman Marcus team collaborated with GQ on a men’s fashion shoot at the Bonneville Salt Flats.

Mar 6, 2014

Brunello Cucinelli at Neiman Marcus

Feb 4, 2014
Feb 4, 2014
Recent Work
Nov 19, 2013 / 1 note

Recent Work

Nov 7, 2013 / 1 note

Jac Jagaciak and Catherine McNeil on set with photographer Kristian Schuller.

Nov 4, 2013 / 4 notes
Nov 4, 2013
Oct 23, 2013
Sep 11, 2013 / 3 notes

Karlina Caune by David Bellemere for Vogue Turkey


Introducing Vanity Fair’s 100th Anniversary Issue, Featuring Cover Model Kate Upton




by Vanity Fair



http://www.vanityfair.com/online/daily/2013/09/100th-anniversary-issue-kate-upton 
Photographed by Annie Leibovitz, model-actress Kate Upton graces the cover of Vanity Fair’s 100th-anniversary issue, blowing out a celebratory candle to wish the magazine a happy birthday.
In his Editor’s Letter, Vanity Faireditor Graydon Carter remarks on the magazine’s milestone: “In an age when nothing seems to last—not convictions, not even cities—a centennial, like the one Vanity Faircelebrates this year, makes me marvel at the simple fact of longevity.”
“Magazines have ‘bones’—the unchanging elements that give structure to creativity—as surely as gardens and houses do,” writes Carter. “Today’s magazine is different in countless ways from yesterday’s—as even the briefest excursion through this issue will show. But I like to think that if [Vanity Fair’s first editor] Frank Crowninshield…could see the modern Vanity Fair, stripped of its logo and other identifying marks, he’d know in an instant what he held in his hands.”
Inside the issue, Leibovitz photographs Upton lounging on the moon, mimicking the illustration on the original cover of Dress & Vanity Fair from October 1, 1913. Upton tells contributing editor Jim Windolf that her road to success wasn’t always easy: “I’m not going to name names, but one agency told me, ‘You’re too American, and everybody knows American women are lazy.’ I was so offended! I’ve never been so offended! I was like, ‘You know that you’re in America, right?’ And it wasn’t ‘American models’—it was ‘American women are lazy,’ period! I feel like a lot of women would disagree with that. A lot!”
Elsewhere in the issue, the editors collected many of the magazine’s most iconic images—including portraits by Leibovitz, Mario Testino, Bruce Weber, and Edward Steichen, plus illustrations from the Jazz Age. To mark the century, Carter also commissioned 10 essayists to write about each decade of the magazine’s life. They include: Bill Maher, Dave Eggers, Kurt Andersen, Lorne Michaels, Robert Stone, Jan Morris, Daniel Okrent, Laura Hillenbrand, A. Scott Berg, and Julian Fellowes.
To accompany the print edition’s tribute to our history, vanityfair.com will launch an anniversary hub, where more than 200 pieces of archival and original content will be showcased. The Vanity Fair at 100 section will launch on September 4, and will feature videos, articles, slide shows, interactive features, and Spotify playlists.

The October issue of Vanity Fair will be available on newsstands in New York and L.A. on September 5 and nationally on the iPad, Nook, and Kindle on September 10.
Sep 3, 2013

Introducing Vanity Fair’s 100th Anniversary Issue, Featuring Cover Model Kate Upton



http://www.vanityfair.com/online/daily/2013/09/100th-anniversary-issue-kate-upton 

Photographed by Annie Leibovitz, model-actress Kate Upton graces the cover of Vanity Fair’s 100th-anniversary issue, blowing out a celebratory candle to wish the magazine a happy birthday.

In his Editor’s Letter, Vanity Faireditor Graydon Carter remarks on the magazine’s milestone: “In an age when nothing seems to last—not convictions, not even cities—a centennial, like the one Vanity Faircelebrates this year, makes me marvel at the simple fact of longevity.”

“Magazines have ‘bones’—the unchanging elements that give structure to creativity—as surely as gardens and houses do,” writes Carter. “Today’s magazine is different in countless ways from yesterday’s—as even the briefest excursion through this issue will show. But I like to think that if [Vanity Fair’s first editor] Frank Crowninshield…could see the modern Vanity Fair, stripped of its logo and other identifying marks, he’d know in an instant what he held in his hands.”

Inside the issue, Leibovitz photographs Upton lounging on the moon, mimicking the illustration on the original cover of Dress & Vanity Fair from October 1, 1913. Upton tells contributing editor Jim Windolf that her road to success wasn’t always easy: “I’m not going to name names, but one agency told me, ‘You’re too American, and everybody knows American women are lazy.’ I was so offended! I’ve never been so offended! I was like, ‘You know that you’re in America, right?’ And it wasn’t ‘American models’—it was ‘American women are lazy,’ period! I feel like a lot of women would disagree with that. A lot!”

Elsewhere in the issue, the editors collected many of the magazine’s most iconic images—including portraits by Leibovitz, Mario Testino, Bruce Weber, and Edward Steichen, plus illustrations from the Jazz Age. To mark the century, Carter also commissioned 10 essayists to write about each decade of the magazine’s life. They include: Bill Maher, Dave Eggers, Kurt Andersen, Lorne Michaels, Robert Stone, Jan Morris, Daniel Okrent, Laura Hillenbrand, A. Scott Berg, and Julian Fellowes.

To accompany the print edition’s tribute to our history, vanityfair.com will launch an anniversary hub, where more than 200 pieces of archival and original content will be showcased. The Vanity Fair at 100 section will launch on September 4, and will feature videos, articles, slide shows, interactive features, and Spotify playlists.

The October issue of Vanity Fair will be available on newsstands in New York and L.A. on September 5 and nationally on the iPad, Nook, and Kindle on September 10.

http://tmagazine.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/08/22/legacy-a-history-of-picture-perfect-icons-at-dna/?smid=tu-share


Clockwise from top right: Vogue Paris, April 2012, Cover By David Sims; courtesy of DNA (2).Clockwise from left: Anita Pallenberg looking at her booking chart at the Catherine Harlé agency circa 1965; the DNA model Doutzen Kroes on the cover of French Vogue in 2012; the agency’s first head sheet featuring Nico (third row, center) in 1962.
For the family-run DNA agency, models should be timeless icons rather than anonymous faces — and it’s been championing this idea for over half a century.
They popped champagne every evening. In the social swirl of 1960s Paris, the Catherine Harlé modeling agency had become a salon of sorts, with “It” girls like Anita Pallenberg, Amanda Lear, Nico, Veruschka and Anna Karina on its roster, members of Andy Warhol’s Factory sleeping on the couch, the Rolling Stones crashing in a bedroom upstairs when they came through town, and photographers and filmmakers stopping in to clink glasses and meet the talent. The pop singer Jacques Dutronc celebrated the agency in his hit song “Les Play-Boys” and was photographed for Paris-Match lying on the bed upstairs surrounded by models. “If I could go back in time,” Linda Evangelista says, “I’d like to go back there, just for one day. That’s what modeling, that’s what our industry should be like. I wish it was.”
Presiding over it all was Catherine Harlé herself. A photographer who worked in magazines and advertising, and then for Dorian Leigh, who opened the first modeling agency in Paris, Harlé was 37 years old and a single mother when she opened her own agency in 1959 in the living room of her apartment. Within a few years she outgrew it and moved to an entire building in Passage Choiseul. “My mother was a great talent scout,” her son, Nicolas Harlé, says. “She could see a girl and say, ‘This one is perfect for pictures.’ ”
It was a family affair, and one that would unfold in both Paris and New York over three generations. Catherine’s sisters worked with her, as did her nephew, Jerome Bonnouvrier, who would eventually run the agency and then start his own, Glamour. His son, David Bonnouvrier, joined him there, and together they went on to found DNA, today one of the biggest industry players in New York.
Harlé had a gift for capturing — and capitalizing on — the moment. She saw the Swinging London fixture Amanda Lear’s androgyny as a natural foil for Paco Rabanne’s metallic miniskirts. She convinced Anna Karina to pose in a bubble bath for an ad that caught Jean-Luc Godard’s eye and led to her film career and their marriage. She signed up Talitha Getty, the socialite wife of John Paul Getty Jr., and Marianne Faithfull, the English pop star and Mick Jagger’s girlfriend, who were not professional mannequins but who brought a certain decadent jet-set cultural cachet. And Harlé, who worked the phones in Pucci dresses while smoking Sobranie cigarettes, was part of the circle. She got into astrology, mysticism and jewelry from India, traveled to Istanbul with her son and Anita Pallenberg and Keith Richards, and sent Richards to a “Dr. Feelgood” who cured him of hepatitis with narcotic shots. Harlé was godmother to the couple’s son, Marlon.
Clockwise from top left: Peter Knapp/The Sunday Times Magazine/News UK Syndication; courtesy of DNA; courtesy of Georges Dambier/Bonni Benrubi Gallery; courtesy of DNA (2); Jacques Haillot/Apis/Sygma/Corbis.Clockwise from top left: Nicole de la Marge shot by Peter Knapp for The Sunday Times Magazine, 1966; Harlé at her agency, in her Paris apartment, circa 1968; the model turned actress Anna Karina in Paris in 1959; Amanda Lear’s comp card at the Catherine Harlé agency; Katoucha shot by Irving Penn for Vogue, 1988; the British singer Marianne Faithfull in France, 1965.
It was a heady scene, but by the ’70s, Jerome Bonnouvrier was ready for a new one. “They didn’t agree on the way the agency should be run,” David says. “They had a generational clash.” Jerome left to start his own agency, Glamour, in 1975. Harlé lost interest in the business over the next few years, preferring to travel instead, and she closed her agency at the end of the decade.
Jerome ran a more modern, computerized agency, but he upheld the tradition of working with his relatives and forging close bonds with the models themselves. Glamour was in the Courrèges building on Rue François Premier, close to the other couture houses. “We would see M. St. Laurent and M. Givenchy walking out of fittings at lunchtime,” David recalls. “The girls would come by the agency on their break, in their white bathrobes — the black women at St. Laurent who were legendary, Katoucha, Rebecca. They were part of the family.”
Over the ensuing years, Glamour lost its luster. The Bonnouvriers made a deal with the Wilhelmina agency, and David moved to New York to run its top division, but the merger ended badly in 1993. With the backing of a new investor they started the Partners agency, with offices in New York and Paris, where Hedi Slimane worked as an assistant, coordinating test shoots. After a power struggle, the Bonnouvriers were locked out and had to start over once again.
They did it differently this time. Two friends lent them enough money to rent a raw loft in TriBeCa with holes in the walls and no phone lines. Now they just needed a name. A friend had an idea. “It was in the middle of the O. J. Simpson trial,” David explains. “He tells me, ‘You should call your agency DNA. It’s everywhere, on the radio, on TV, every 10 seconds, Barry Scheck, DNA. It makes total sense, and everybody will remember it right away.’ ”
DNA today is housed in an airy loft on the top floor of a warehouse in West Chelsea. “We got really lucky,” says David, now 47, as he smokes Marlboro Reds over espresso. “A girl came to see us who had been represented by a multitude of agencies in New York, but no one ever did anything with her, and that was Annie Morton. Annie is sort of the George Washington of DNA,” he says, laughing. “We should have a painted period portrait of Annie!” As he tells it, it wasn’t a matter of their seeing something in her that others hadn’t but of their complete dedication to her. “Because we had no other girls to work on,” David says, “she became Linda, Christy, Naomi, all in one. We worked so hard on her that she ended up on the cover of British Vogue, and she mapped us.”
Clockwise from top left: Stella Tennant by Solve Sundsbo, I-D, The Best of British Issue, No. 297, March 2009; Arthur Elgort/Courtesy of DNA; Pamela Hanson/Courtesy Of DNA; David Sims/Vogue © The Condé Nast Publications Ltd.Clockwise from top left: Stella Tennant on the cover of i-D in 2009; the DNA head David Bonnouvrier, Amber Valletta, the DNA agent Didier Fernandez and Karolina Kurkova in Milan, 2002; one of DNA’s newest faces, Edie Campbell, on the cover of British Vogue earlier this year; Bonnouvrier (far right) with some of his iconic models at the Met ball in 2009.
The “turning point,” David says, was when the Bonnouvriers discovered Karolina Kurkova in Milan. “We walked into a small agency, and she was sitting on the sofa, with her big smile, which was just contagious.” At 15, she made it onto the cover of American Vogue. In the cutthroat microcosm of New York modeling agencies, DNA had established its bona fides. And then they signed Natalia Vodianova, the ethereal Russian who would become the face of Calvin Klein. “With Natalia,” David says, “it was like, Wow, it’s as good as it gets.” What he means is not so much her preternatural features as the ineffable qualities of a model who can transcend the nameless ranks. “They all have a beautiful face,” he says. “They all have a beautiful body. They all have beautiful legs. And more. And plus. We’re running out of superlatives! It’s really the character, the individuality, the personality.”
The role of the agency, he says, is “to empower them to become that great model by education.” DNA takes its pupils through a crash course on fashion-photography history — Arthur Elgort, Irving Penn — with the most promising gaining admission to a kind of graduate seminar. “The Steven [Meisel] school is the school,” David says. “It’s the amount of time he spends on looking at them, studying them, teaching them. He shows them pictures. He shows them cue cards. There’s a mirror.”
DNA has signed some of the biggest names, from Raquel Zimmermann to Doutzen Kroes, but the agency also has cultivated a kind of Hall of Fame lineup over time, with Linda Evangelista, Stella Tennant, Kristen McMenamy, Amber Valletta, Shalom Harlow, Nadja Auermann and Trish Goff (who lives with David Bonnouvrier). In an industry and a culture that clamor for the next big thing, this was a deliberate decision. “I think we created an agency for them,” David says. “DNA became the sanctuary and the safeguard of a certain integrity.”
A few years ago, Stella Tennant says, David talked with the casting agent for Calvin Klein’s runway show. “They’d had this period of having new girls, and it was very anonymous — there were no faces that were familiar anymore,” she says over the phone from Scotland. “I don’t know quite what the conversation was, but somehow Calvin Klein decided to get some old-school faces in there — Kristen McMenamy, Kirsty Hume and myself. For me, that seemed to be a big shift. And I think David was really instrumental in that. I feel like he understands that there is longevity, rather than, ‘Oh, they’ve done it — they’re over.’ ”
“They’re iconic,” David says. “They’re fashion. Stella could have been modeling for Poiret. Linda is the model of all time, to its strictest definition. She could be out of a Cecil Beaton picture, she could be out of a Guy Bourdin picture. Most of my competitors probably don’t know who those photographers are, but I didn’t come from the same mold.” His father died in 2009, and now, as heir to his family’s history — he keeps Catherine Harlé’s loupe, through which she studied her contact sheets, like a totem on his desk — he proudly maintains this anachronistic stance, at a time when one could easily get the impression that modeling has more to do with reality TV shows than with Cecil Beaton.
“I would tell you that we’re probably going around in a circle and getting back to the beginning, with DNA, to what Catherine was doing,” he says thoughtfully. “The people we represent would have been represented by her 40 years ago.” He looks at the archival photos spread before him, souvenirs of a different time. “The reason DNA exists today is because of Catherine. She’s the DNA of DNA. There’s no doubt about it.”
Aug 23, 2013

http://tmagazine.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/08/22/legacy-a-history-of-picture-perfect-icons-at-dna/?smid=tu-share




Clockwise from top right: Vogue Paris, April 2012, Cover By David Sims; courtesy of DNA (2).Clockwise from left: Anita Pallenberg looking at her booking chart at the Catherine Harlé agency circa 1965; the DNA model Doutzen Kroes on the cover of French Vogue in 2012; the agency’s first head sheet featuring Nico (third row, center) in 1962.

For the family-run DNA agency, models should be timeless icons rather than anonymous faces — and it’s been championing this idea for over half a century.

They popped champagne every evening. In the social swirl of 1960s Paris, the Catherine Harlé modeling agency had become a salon of sorts, with “It” girls like Anita Pallenberg, Amanda Lear, Nico, Veruschka and Anna Karina on its roster, members of Andy Warhol’s Factory sleeping on the couch, the Rolling Stones crashing in a bedroom upstairs when they came through town, and photographers and filmmakers stopping in to clink glasses and meet the talent. The pop singer Jacques Dutronc celebrated the agency in his hit song “Les Play-Boys” and was photographed for Paris-Match lying on the bed upstairs surrounded by models. “If I could go back in time,” Linda Evangelista says, “I’d like to go back there, just for one day. That’s what modeling, that’s what our industry should be like. I wish it was.”

Presiding over it all was Catherine Harlé herself. A photographer who worked in magazines and advertising, and then for Dorian Leigh, who opened the first modeling agency in Paris, Harlé was 37 years old and a single mother when she opened her own agency in 1959 in the living room of her apartment. Within a few years she outgrew it and moved to an entire building in Passage Choiseul. “My mother was a great talent scout,” her son, Nicolas Harlé, says. “She could see a girl and say, ‘This one is perfect for pictures.’ ”

It was a family affair, and one that would unfold in both Paris and New York over three generations. Catherine’s sisters worked with her, as did her nephew, Jerome Bonnouvrier, who would eventually run the agency and then start his own, Glamour. His son, David Bonnouvrier, joined him there, and together they went on to found DNA, today one of the biggest industry players in New York.

Harlé had a gift for capturing — and capitalizing on — the moment. She saw the Swinging London fixture Amanda Lear’s androgyny as a natural foil for Paco Rabanne’s metallic miniskirts. She convinced Anna Karina to pose in a bubble bath for an ad that caught Jean-Luc Godard’s eye and led to her film career and their marriage. She signed up Talitha Getty, the socialite wife of John Paul Getty Jr., and Marianne Faithfull, the English pop star and Mick Jagger’s girlfriend, who were not professional mannequins but who brought a certain decadent jet-set cultural cachet. And Harlé, who worked the phones in Pucci dresses while smoking Sobranie cigarettes, was part of the circle. She got into astrology, mysticism and jewelry from India, traveled to Istanbul with her son and Anita Pallenberg and Keith Richards, and sent Richards to a “Dr. Feelgood” who cured him of hepatitis with narcotic shots. Harlé was godmother to the couple’s son, Marlon.

Clockwise from top left: Nicole de la Marge shot by Peter Knapp for The Sunday Times Magazine, 1966; Harlé at her agency, in her Paris apartment, circa 1968; the model turned actress Anna Karina in Paris in 1959; Amanda Lear’s comp card at the Catherine Harlé agency; Katoucha shot by Irving Penn for Vogue, 1988; the British singer Marianne Faithfull in France, 1965.Clockwise from top left: Peter Knapp/The Sunday Times Magazine/News UK Syndication; courtesy of DNA; courtesy of Georges Dambier/Bonni Benrubi Gallery; courtesy of DNA (2); Jacques Haillot/Apis/Sygma/Corbis.Clockwise from top left: Nicole de la Marge shot by Peter Knapp for The Sunday Times Magazine, 1966; Harlé at her agency, in her Paris apartment, circa 1968; the model turned actress Anna Karina in Paris in 1959; Amanda Lear’s comp card at the Catherine Harlé agency; Katoucha shot by Irving Penn for Vogue, 1988; the British singer Marianne Faithfull in France, 1965.

It was a heady scene, but by the ’70s, Jerome Bonnouvrier was ready for a new one. “They didn’t agree on the way the agency should be run,” David says. “They had a generational clash.” Jerome left to start his own agency, Glamour, in 1975. Harlé lost interest in the business over the next few years, preferring to travel instead, and she closed her agency at the end of the decade.

Jerome ran a more modern, computerized agency, but he upheld the tradition of working with his relatives and forging close bonds with the models themselves. Glamour was in the Courrèges building on Rue François Premier, close to the other couture houses. “We would see M. St. Laurent and M. Givenchy walking out of fittings at lunchtime,” David recalls. “The girls would come by the agency on their break, in their white bathrobes — the black women at St. Laurent who were legendary, Katoucha, Rebecca. They were part of the family.”

Over the ensuing years, Glamour lost its luster. The Bonnouvriers made a deal with the Wilhelmina agency, and David moved to New York to run its top division, but the merger ended badly in 1993. With the backing of a new investor they started the Partners agency, with offices in New York and Paris, where Hedi Slimane worked as an assistant, coordinating test shoots. After a power struggle, the Bonnouvriers were locked out and had to start over once again.

They did it differently this time. Two friends lent them enough money to rent a raw loft in TriBeCa with holes in the walls and no phone lines. Now they just needed a name. A friend had an idea. “It was in the middle of the O. J. Simpson trial,” David explains. “He tells me, ‘You should call your agency DNA. It’s everywhere, on the radio, on TV, every 10 seconds, Barry Scheck, DNA. It makes total sense, and everybody will remember it right away.’ ”

DNA today is housed in an airy loft on the top floor of a warehouse in West Chelsea. “We got really lucky,” says David, now 47, as he smokes Marlboro Reds over espresso. “A girl came to see us who had been represented by a multitude of agencies in New York, but no one ever did anything with her, and that was Annie Morton. Annie is sort of the George Washington of DNA,” he says, laughing. “We should have a painted period portrait of Annie!” As he tells it, it wasn’t a matter of their seeing something in her that others hadn’t but of their complete dedication to her. “Because we had no other girls to work on,” David says, “she became Linda, Christy, Naomi, all in one. We worked so hard on her that she ended up on the cover of British Vogue, and she mapped us.”

Clockwise from top left: Stella Tennant on the cover of i-D in 2009; the DNA head David Bonnouvrier, Amber Valletta, the DNA agent Didier Fernandez and Karolina Kurkova in Milan, 2002; one of DNA’s newest faces, Edie Campbell, on the cover of British Vogue earlier this year; Bonnouvrier (far right) with some of his iconic models at the Met ball in 2009.Clockwise from top left: Stella Tennant by Solve Sundsbo, I-D, The Best of British Issue, No. 297, March 2009; Arthur Elgort/Courtesy of DNA; Pamela Hanson/Courtesy Of DNA; David Sims/Vogue © The Condé Nast Publications Ltd.Clockwise from top left: Stella Tennant on the cover of i-D in 2009; the DNA head David Bonnouvrier, Amber Valletta, the DNA agent Didier Fernandez and Karolina Kurkova in Milan, 2002; one of DNA’s newest faces, Edie Campbell, on the cover of British Vogue earlier this year; Bonnouvrier (far right) with some of his iconic models at the Met ball in 2009.

The “turning point,” David says, was when the Bonnouvriers discovered Karolina Kurkova in Milan. “We walked into a small agency, and she was sitting on the sofa, with her big smile, which was just contagious.” At 15, she made it onto the cover of American Vogue. In the cutthroat microcosm of New York modeling agencies, DNA had established its bona fides. And then they signed Natalia Vodianova, the ethereal Russian who would become the face of Calvin Klein. “With Natalia,” David says, “it was like, Wow, it’s as good as it gets.” What he means is not so much her preternatural features as the ineffable qualities of a model who can transcend the nameless ranks. “They all have a beautiful face,” he says. “They all have a beautiful body. They all have beautiful legs. And more. And plus. We’re running out of superlatives! It’s really the character, the individuality, the personality.”

The role of the agency, he says, is “to empower them to become that great model by education.” DNA takes its pupils through a crash course on fashion-photography history — Arthur Elgort, Irving Penn — with the most promising gaining admission to a kind of graduate seminar. “The Steven [Meisel] school is the school,” David says. “It’s the amount of time he spends on looking at them, studying them, teaching them. He shows them pictures. He shows them cue cards. There’s a mirror.”

DNA has signed some of the biggest names, from Raquel Zimmermann to Doutzen Kroes, but the agency also has cultivated a kind of Hall of Fame lineup over time, with Linda Evangelista, Stella Tennant, Kristen McMenamy, Amber Valletta, Shalom Harlow, Nadja Auermann and Trish Goff (who lives with David Bonnouvrier). In an industry and a culture that clamor for the next big thing, this was a deliberate decision. “I think we created an agency for them,” David says. “DNA became the sanctuary and the safeguard of a certain integrity.”

A few years ago, Stella Tennant says, David talked with the casting agent for Calvin Klein’s runway show. “They’d had this period of having new girls, and it was very anonymous — there were no faces that were familiar anymore,” she says over the phone from Scotland. “I don’t know quite what the conversation was, but somehow Calvin Klein decided to get some old-school faces in there — Kristen McMenamy, Kirsty Hume and myself. For me, that seemed to be a big shift. And I think David was really instrumental in that. I feel like he understands that there is longevity, rather than, ‘Oh, they’ve done it — they’re over.’ ”

“They’re iconic,” David says. “They’re fashion. Stella could have been modeling for Poiret. Linda is the model of all time, to its strictest definition. She could be out of a Cecil Beaton picture, she could be out of a Guy Bourdin picture. Most of my competitors probably don’t know who those photographers are, but I didn’t come from the same mold.” His father died in 2009, and now, as heir to his family’s history — he keeps Catherine Harlé’s loupe, through which she studied her contact sheets, like a totem on his desk — he proudly maintains this anachronistic stance, at a time when one could easily get the impression that modeling has more to do with reality TV shows than with Cecil Beaton.

“I would tell you that we’re probably going around in a circle and getting back to the beginning, with DNA, to what Catherine was doing,” he says thoughtfully. “The people we represent would have been represented by her 40 years ago.” He looks at the archival photos spread before him, souvenirs of a different time. “The reason DNA exists today is because of Catherine. She’s the DNA of DNA. There’s no doubt about it.”